2/29/2008

"Where common hopes and common dreams still live.”

Entering the presidential nomination process as a distinct underdog, his expressed views were seen as more moderate than those of rivals. Other contenders, especially those with more governmental experience, had acquired enemies within the party and were weak in the critical states. As a freshman House member, he was not a particularly powerful or influential figure. However, he spoke out against the War. I'm not talking about the Iraq War, I'm talking about the Mexican-American War. And the person I am describing is not Barack Obama, it is Abraham Lincoln. The other tall skinny guy from Illinois (I know Lincoln was born in Kentucky-Obama was born in Hawaii). I know that one was a Republican and one is a Democrat, but the Republican Party then resembles more of what the Democratic party does today. Somewhere along the way they switched ideals. I am aware of the differences, but chose instead to highlight the similarities. For one simple reason; and that's to show that it can be done. Of course I hope for a better ending to Obama's presidency than old Abe's, I believe the legacy they leave will be on par. This is history in the making folks and not in a Gorge Bush way. I work in a bar (more or less), after work I sit down to have a few drinks and often get into discussions with random people about the merits of Sen. Obama. The first argument often thrown up is his lack of experience. Like Obama, Lincoln didn't have much experience before becoming president and leading the nation through a turbulent era. I am by far not the first one to draw these comparisons, just Google the two names and see for yourself. Obama himself kicked of his campaign on the steps of the Old State Capitol in Springfield Illinois where Lincoln served as a House Representative. He even said, ”That is why, in the shadow of the Old State Capitol, where Lincoln once called on a house divided to stand together, where common hopes and common dreams still live.”




BARACK OBAMA

ABRAHAM LINCOLN


EARLY CAREER:

Illinois lawyer

Illinois lawyer


CAREER IN STATE POLITICS:

8 years in Illinois State Senate
(1996-2004)

8 year in Illinois State House of Representatives (1834-1842)


CAREER IN NATIONAL POLITICS:

2 years in U.S. Senate
(2004-2006)

2 years in U.S. House of Representatives
(1846-1848)


PROPELLED TO NATIONAL POLITICS BY:

Speech at the 2004 Democratic National Convention on – among other things - similarities of people in the “red” and “blue” states.

Speech in 1860 at Cooper Union on – among other things - similarities of people in the northern and southern states


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